Sweet William’s Ghost: A Deadly Ballad

A dead lover returns to his still-alive fiance in the form of an apparition. He asks her to free him of their engagement or he's bound for hell (dramatic much?). That's essentially the gist of this English Ballad, which has many lyrical and musical variations. Of course, there's a push and pull between the ghost... Continue Reading →

A 19th Century Prison Wedding

On the night of November 13, 1885, a buggy rolled up to the Chatham Hill Gaol under the cover of darkness. Out leaped 18 year-old Mollie Downes, her brother, and a minister. What was this young woman about to do? Marry a prisoner, of course. a a Her beloved, James Fauntleroy, was in the Virginian... Continue Reading →

Publication in Suspense Magazine!

Please check out my latest publication! "Do You Hear the Coffin Bell?", a Victorian short story filled with suspense, was republished in Suspense Magazine's Winter 2019 issue. Suspense Magazine's Winter 2019 issue can be accessed here. Between interviews with the likes of Dean Koontz and Janet Evanovich in this issue, you can find little, ol'... Continue Reading →

20 Weird Victorian Superstitions About Death

Today’s society might think of Victorians as staunch followers of etiquette and formalities, with a straight-laced attitude and overzealous attitude towards Christian religion. However, the Victorians are more dynamic than this modern day perception. The Victorians were surrounded by superstitions in their daily lives, adding an extra layer to an otherwise “stuffy” time period. Most... Continue Reading →

The Fox Sisters

With Halloween upon us, it is fitting to focus on spiritualism and the occult for this blog post. This week, I'll be focusing on the Fox Sisters, who are the epitome of the saying, "Trick or Treat." These three girls, Leah, Margaret, and Catherine Fox, helped to found spiritualism, which is the belief that spirits... Continue Reading →

Thornseat Lodge

Not much information exists on Thornseat Lodge. It's a dilapidating hunting lodge in Yorkshire. It is abandoned, not kept, but its beauty remains apparent in the architecture. It's walls still tell a story, even if little of that story can be found on the great, wide internet. Thornseat Lodge was built in 1855 for Thomas... Continue Reading →

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